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in the "washington post," "the boston globe," slate, the beirut daily star, san francisco magazine, "mother jones," and many, many others. eventually mr. jim and document a spectator and the daily car will be joining us and when he does i will give him a proper introduction. would the gentleman i have a right now i think a good way to get started, so those are three different perspectives, too represented here now, these are for philosophies in the midst of a campaign season, we are left and right and whatever is in between but i suppose that might be libertarian, dictator or influence on this election are outlined the american body politic. i think we should start with you individuals describing what it means to be a liberal. we will start with mr. scher. >> thanks very much for doing this. thank you for having us here. i've always defined liberalism very simply. the three r.'s of government. a government that is representative of all the people, that is responsive to the peoples concerned and is responsible of managing our resources both financial and natural. and that to me is the kind of gove
and experienced civil society by going to boston symphony and best of all, enjoyed pickled tongue sandwiches in brooklyn, he was leading when he was a young man. i want to frame my remarks today a round hue fong's ridings which are exemplified in this because of my great respect for him and affection for him, i want to try to convey the majesty of what he has done but in a friendly, constructive way, pushed a little bit on a few points. specifically i want to engage hue fong's work in four respect that i trust will aluminate broader points about the challenges of law reform in china. the first concerns the chinese tradition. hue fong takes great pride in his heritage as he should but he does not view it prior to engagement with the west in the nineteenth century as providing abundant resources for the construction of rule of law today. i understand full well hue fong's desire to avoid dimensions of t t t t t t t t ts that constrain all, and i am aware because i argue now for the greater attention to the chinese past how some observers in china do invoke it to avoid talking about reform today
way to boston where she was a heroin. they erected a statute to are. the first statute to an american woman, shows her with a hatchet in one hand and a scalpel in another. kenneth davis is our guest on sunday on in depth. the best selling author of the don't know much series. watch live at an eastern booktv on c-span2. >> now a group of american diplomats and former ambassadors advised the next administration to focus its foreign policy effort on issue. former ambassador to iraq chris hill said political gridlock is hurting u.s. foreign policy objectives. and asian policy is a good place to rebuild i partisanship to the discussion is just under two hours. >> thank you all for being here this afternoon, and welcome to georgetown university. we've come together today for a special conversation, a conversation between top diplomats, past and present, each of whom has played a significant role in u.s. asia relations over the past two decades. with representatives from the administrations of george h. w. bush through the current administration of barack obama, our guest speakers today offe
federal judges, including famously an appeals court judge to sit on the appeals court in boston who has been back, he's in portland, and he's been backed by both republican senators became as part of they call, what difficult? the thurman road which was -- >> the thurman leahy rule. spent the person to look to for some guidance here is a interesting, the senator-elect from maine. who was governor as an independent. you probably all know this by now but is coming to washington, claiming that he is his party installation, his party a lime is up for grabs. his initial request was that he would align with whichever party agreed to push for a essentially a doing away with the current filibuster rules. harry reid has made clear he's not going to go that far but we still think angus king will end up combining with the democrats. he did after all endorsed obama. >> and he said yesterday that he had several conversations with him in the past 24 hours. >> and the best he could do was get a phone call from bob corker. sounds like only one side is courting him. but the point being that it is, this
-- to deal with that is to say no, that is not to. we're in boston, we're in kuwait. we have 2000 mosques. i don't think a straight effective quite frankly. i think a much better approach is an approach which combined with the kind of things we do with exchange programs and other softer means, public diplomacy 2.0, to get to a point where people can believe that. that the pernicious belief. it's wrong but people can believe. it doesn't mean they will kill us. so those are the goals. it is a battle of ideas, but it's a battle of ideas that will take a long time to win. i do think and public diplomacy we sometimes forget the imports of that ideological struggle, which may be the most important of all. >> i think i would say it somewhat differently but you've heard me say earlier that i believe quite passionately that public diplomacy is there to ensure that everything we do that we achieve our foreign policy goals and objectives, which frankly very country to country, region to region. and so in some parts of the world, some of the struggles we've been talking about are higher than they are in
in colonial boston, you can imagine what that might have been like. when i was writing about franklinite realize a large part of the story was going to consist of franklin growing old because he became america's emissary to france during the american revolution at the age of 70. i started writing about franklin when i was around 40 and i really wondered whether i was going to be able to understand what it was like to grow old and infirm which was a large part of a franklin story. partly for this reason, i decided, and this is carried through in my other book, i decided to tell my stories, i try to relate the lives of my characters as much as possible through the perceptions, the words of people who knew them. my books tend to have more eyewitness stuff than some others. if i have a choice between writing a scene in my own words and writing a scene in the words of somebody who was mayor, i will tend toward the person who was there. that conveys a certain authenticity and it relieves me of the burden really of sort of providing the authority because the question anyone should have is how d
at boston university. high school is an interesting question. it's where i started playing football. and it's hard to figure where on the spectrum it fits. we know youth is probably more dangerous than high school. we know that high school is a big part of our culture. i kind of want to go back, i have a lots of notes here to separate youth from kind of professional and then kind of where we're in the middle. because i think this discussion is really what is unique about football versus other sports and while we're having the discussion. a lot comes down to the adult game is not really separated from the youth game. in a meaningful way. like soccer there's no heading before a search age. no checking in ice hockey. baseball no curve ball. we don't do that football. it's the real game where head contact is not rare, and accidental. and so i think we have to kind of identify that as a big issue. but i think we have to look to in terms what we should be doing we actually can look up to the nfl and the nfl pa about steps they have made in the last two years to make the game safer. you look at th
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7